Archive for the ‘genes’ Category

World Map of Transgenic Core Facilities

Saturday, April 7th, 2012
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World Map of Transgenic Core Facilities

World Map of Transgenic Core Facilities

At the International Society for Transgenic Technologies (ISTT) web site, according to the aims of our Society. we care to provide the entire scientific community with as much information as possible regarding how and where to generate genetically modified animals, particularly transgenic and knockout mice, as useful animal models for research projects in biology, biotechnology and biomedicine. One of these resources of information is the World Map of Transgenic Core Facilities, currently holding more than 125 links to web sites of transgenic core facilities located in 27 countries, world wide. The transgenic core facilities can be easily found in a list, arranged per country, or using a useful Google Maps built-in feature depicting the geographic location of each transgenic facility.

Is your transgenic core facility not yet listed in the World Map of Transgenic Core Facilities offered from the ISTT web site? No problem. Whether public or private, whether based on an academic environment or associated with a company, all transgenic core facilities, all initiatives meant to produce transgenic animals (mice, rats, other mammals, other vertebrates,…) on demand, for research purposes, are welcome and we, at the ISTT, will be pleased to include all these links in our web site. Please contact us at istt@transtechsociety.org and send us your web link and contact details of your transgenic core facility and we will be more than happy to add your transgenic core facility to the list of World Map of Transgenic Core Facilities.

Thanks for submitting the web site of your Transgenic Core Facility to the ISTT.

EMMA Cryopreservation Workshop, Madrid, Spain, 7-8 May 2012

Thursday, February 16th, 2012
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EMMA Cryopreservation Workshop, Madrid, Spain, 7-8 May 2012

EMMA Cryopreservation Workshop, Madrid, Spain, 7-8 May 2012

The International Society for Transgenic Technologies (ISTT) co-sponsors the EMMA Cryopreservation Workshop, organized by EMMA (the European Mouse Mutant Archive) and CSIC (the Spanish Research Council) and to be held at the CSIC Main Campus, in Madrid (Spain), on 7-8 May 2012. The Organizers of this workshop are Martin Fray (Mammalian Genetics Unit, MRC, Harwell, UK; Biological Resources Manager at the EMMA node in MRC-MGU-Harwell and ISTT Member), Michael Hagn (Institute of Experimental Genetics, HMGU, Munich, Germany; EMMA Project Manager) and Lluis Montoliu (National Center of Biotechnology, CNB-CSIC, Madrid, Spain; Spanish EMMA node co-ordinator and ISTT Member).  The Organizers have selected a number of speakers in the field and hot topics in cryopreservation with a main focus on technology. The main aim of this workshop is to discuss openly all topics at length and in depth, from past and present initiatives, undertaken by the various archiving initiatives world-wide, invited to this workshop, to the current and future challenges all bio-repositories have to face and address adequately. Topics that will be discussed include: embryo and organ cryopreservation, sperm cryopreservation and IVF, ICSI, mouse production, morula/ES aggregation method, transportation issues with frozen and unfrozen biological material and various continental efforts towards cryopreservation. Additional information can be obtained from workshop web site.

Confirmed invited participants include:

  • Sue Bath (Melbourne, Australia)
  • Martina Crispo (Institut Pasteur, Montevideo, Uruguay)
  • Xiang Gao (Model Animal Research Center, Nanjing University, Nanjing, P.R. China)
  • Marina Gertsenstein (Toronto Centre for Phenogenomics, Toronto, ON, Canada)
  • Alan Hart (MRC-Human Genetics Unit at MRC/IGMM, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK)
  • Jean Jaubert (Institut Pasteur, Paris, France)
  • Carlisle Landel (Thomas Jefferson University, Kimmel Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA, USA)
  • Kent Lloyd (Mouse Biology Program, University of California, Davis, CA, USA)
  • Peter Mazur (The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, USA)
  • Keiji Mochida (RIKEN Bioresource Center, Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki, Japan)
  • Pedro Moreira (European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Monterotondo/Rome, Italy)
  • Naomi Nakagata (Center for Animal Resources & Development-CARD, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, Japan)
  • Lauryl Nutter (Toronto Centre for Phenogenomics, Toronto, ON, Canada)
  • Atsuo Ogura (RIKEN Bioresource Center, Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki, Japan)
  • Sagrario Ortega (National Cancer Research Center, CNIO-ISCIII, Madrid, Spain)
  • Belén Pintado (National Center of Biotechnology, CNB-CSIC, Madrid, Spain)
  • Marcello Raspa (EMMA-CNR, Monterotondo/Rome, Italy)
  • Stuart Read (The Australian National University, The Australian Phenomics Facility, Canberra, Australia)
  • Jorge Sztein (CMB Cryopreservation and Assisted Reproduction, NIAID-NIH, Rockville, MD, USA)
  • Rob Taft (The Jackson Laboratory, Bar Arbor, ME, USA)
  • Toru Takeo (Center for Animal Resources & Development-CARD, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, Japan)
  • Xavier Warot (Center of PhenoGenomics, School of Life Sciences, EPFL, Lausanne, Switzerland)
  • Michael Wiles (The Jackson Laboratory, Bar Arbor, ME, USA)

In addition, the EMMA Cryopreservation workshop will be attended by delegates from EMMA nodes and up to ten (10) current* ISTT members selected among applicants with expertise in cryopreservation, on behalf of the EMMA-ISTT cooperation agreement, for mutual promotion and collaboration, currently in place, and thanks to the specific co-sponsorship of the ISTT agreed by the ISTT council for this EMMA workshop. This is a highly specialized workshop with about 60 participants, all attending by invitation. However, up to ten ISTT members with expertise in cryopreservation will be able to benefit and attend. ISTT members interested and willing to attend this meeting can submit their applications to Lluis Montoliu (montoliu@cnb.csic.es), including a CV and a letter describing how the applicant will benefit from attending the workshop, but also how the applicant will be able to contribute to discussions. Applications should be sent by email to Lluis Montoliu by February 29th, 2012. Thereafter, Organizers will review all received applications and select up to ten ISTT Members with expertise in cryopreservation. All invited participants will be encouraged to actively take part in all discussions throughout the meeting. There is no registration fee for this workshop. Selected ISTT members will be entitled to one night accommodation (7 to 8 May 2012) on behalf of the Organization of this workshop. All participants will be invited to the official Workshop dinner on May 7.

Also, in an effort to disseminate the outcome of this workshop among interested colleagues, the Organizers will make the workshop abstracts, submitted by invited speakers, and some/all of speakers’ slides available on the public EMMA and ISTT web sites, after obtaining the specific permission to share material from each invited speaker.

(*) current ISTT members are those registered/renewed in 2012.

ISTT co-sponsors Course on Managing Mouse Colonies: Genetics, Breeding & Welfare (6-8 June 2012, WTGC, Hinxton, UK)

Thursday, January 12th, 2012
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ISTT co-sponsors Course on Managing Mouse Colonies: Genetics, Breeding & Welfare (6-8 June 2012, WTGC, Hinxton, UK)

ISTT co-sponsors Course on Managing Mouse Colonies: Genetics, Breeding & Welfare (6-8 June 2012, WTGC, Hinxton, UK)

The International Society for Transgenic Technology (ISTT) is most pleased to announce the co-sponsorship of the 2012 Edition of the popular training Course on Managing Mouse Colonies: Genetics, Breeding & Welfare, organized as a collaborative effort by four institutions: MRC Harwell, the Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, the RSPCA Transgenic Training Working Group (TTWG) and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute. The course will be held at the Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge, UK, on June 6-8 June 2012. Registration deadline: 29 February 2012. ISTT members are entitled to a reduced registration fee.

This training Course aims to introduce experienced technicians and scientific staff involved with the management of  genetically-modified mouse colonies to best practice with respect to the 3Rs and animal welfare. The programme covers historical and current best practice in the maintenance of genetically-modified mouse colonies for scientific research and the differing disciplines involved in production, phenotyping and archiving. Topics covered will include: Topics covered will include: nomenclature, basic colony management, maintaining transgenic and gene-targeted lines, breeding for experimental purposes and maintenance of high health status colonies.

Scientific organisers
James Bussell Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, UK, ISTT member
Neil Dear Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, UK
Nikki Osborne RSPCA, UK
Sara Wells Medical Research Council, Harwell, UK

Keynote speakers
Karen Steel Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, UK
Ian Jackson Medical Research Council Human Genetics Unit, UK

Confirmed tutors
James Bussell Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, UK, ISTT member
Neil Dear Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, UK
Adrian Deeny University College London, UK
Martin Fray Medical Research Council, Harwell, UK, ISTT member
Richard Houghton Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, UK, ISTT Member
Natasha Karp Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, UK
Nikki Osborne RSPCA, UK
Sara Wells Medical Research Council, Harwell, UK
Jacqui White Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, UK
Ben Woodman Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, UK


Report from the 2011 Course on Rodents Genetics at Institut Pasteur-Montevideo

Friday, December 30th, 2011
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Report from the 2011 Course on Rodents Genetics at Institut Pasteur-Montevideo

Report from the 2011 Course on Rodents Genetics at Institut Pasteur-Montevideo

The second edition of the International Course on “Genetics of Laboratory Rodents” was held at the Institut Pasteur-Montevideo, Uruguay, from December 5 to 14, 2011, with the co-sponsorization of the International Society for Transgenic Technologies (ISTT). This course was organized by Martina Crispo, DVM – Head of the Transgenic and Experimental Animal Unit – Institut Pasteur de Montevideo, Uruguay, and ISTT Member, and co-organized by Jean Jacques Panthier, PhD – Unité de Genetique Fonctionelle de la Souris – Institut Pasteur, France. The teaching team was composed by Scientists from the Institut Pasteur in Paris and Montevideo as well as other regional and international institutions, who are familiar with the topics, including several ISTT Members (Jean Jaubert, Fernando Benavides, Ignacio Anegon). Students (20 participants, coming from Argentina, Chile, Brazil, Netherlands and Uruguay) were carefully selected among a long list of candidates. Again, as in its first edition, organized in 2008, this course was a very successful event, both from the scientific and social points of view, allowing more than 30 researchers from different countries to spent together ten days for science discussion. Furthermore, all students received credits for their curricula, meaning that this course will be considered as a significant element of their MSc or PhD programs. A full scientific course report is available from the ISTT web site. The ISTT wishes to thank Martina Crispo and her team from the Institut Pasteur de Montevideo, along with the rest of organizers and teachers participating, for succesfully running the second edition of this educational initiative on Laboratory Rodents Genetics in South-America.

The transgenic-list (tg-l) has been moved to ISTT

Wednesday, December 21st, 2011
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The transgenic-list (tg-l) has been moved to ISTT

The transgenic-list (tg-l) has been moved to ISTT

Today, December 21st, 2011, the historical transgenic-list (tg-l), created by Peter Sobieszczuk more than 15 years ago, in July, 1996, has been moved and successfully transferred to its new home at the ISTT web server, following the agreement signed on September 30th, 2011, between Peter and the ISTT. All current subscribers have been transferred automatically and they will be able to continue using and enjoying this useful resource within the field of transgenic animals. This is the new tg-l home web page, where additional information about this transfer and the new features of the tg-l at the ISTT can be browsed.  At the ISTT, the tg-l will continue being public (anyone may subscribe, including ISTT members and non-members alike, but subject to email address verification), unmoderated (messages will not be altered by the list administrator) and closed (only subscribers may post messages). All questions, comments, requests, doubts should be addressed to the new tg-l administrators at: tglist_admin@transtechsociety.org.

 

 

2011 Course on “Genetics of Laboratory Rodents”, Inst. Pasteur-Montevideo, December 5-14

Saturday, November 12th, 2011
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2011 Course on "Genetics of Laboratory Rodents", Inst. Pasteur-Montevideo, December 5-14
2011 Course on “Genetics of Laboratory Rodents”, Inst. Pasteur-Montevideo, December 5-14

Martina Crispo, Head of the Transgenic and Experimental Animal Unit of the Institut Pasteur de Montevideo, Uruguay and ISTT Member, along with Jean-Jacques Panthier (Inst. Pasteur, Paris) organize the 2011 Course on “Genetics of Laboratory Rodents“, that will be held at the Institut Pasteur de Montevideo, Uruguay, on December 5-14. This course is co-sponsored by the International Society for Transgenic Technologies (ISTT). As in the first edition, the aim of this course is to offer a training opportunity to South American research scientists and veterinarians in charge of laboratory animal facilities, in the most prominent areas of mammalian genetics (mostly mouse).  This course offers an opportunity to receive an intensive training and get in touch with scientist of the region working in the same fields of interest. The final program includes the following topics:

Tools for genetic analysis

Laboratory animal husbandry

Basic of mouse reproduction physiology

Population genetics, the breeding systems and the different categories of mouse strains

Origin and phylogeny of the rodent laboratory strains

Wild derived inbred strains

Spontaneous and induced mutations – phenotype driven and genotype driven mutagenesis

Genetic mapping; physical mapping; positional cloning; candidate gene identification

Statistical genetics and complex trait analysis

Transgenesis under its various forms, gene expression analysis, strategies in induced mutagenesis   (knockout, knock in, conditional knockout, etc.)

Bioinformatics in genetics and genomics, database mining

Design of experiments and selection of the best animal models

 

The list of invited speakers includes:

  • Jean Jacques Panthier (Institut Pasteur de Paris, France)
  • Xavier Montagutelli (Institut Pasteur de Paris, France)
  • Jean Louis Guénet (Institut Pasteur de Paris, France)
  • Jean Jaubert (Institut Pasteur de Paris, France)
  • Michel Cohen Tannoudji (Institut Pasteur de Paris, France)
  • Ignacio Anegón (Institut de Transplantation-Urologie-Néphrologie,France)
  • Marcelo Rubinstein (Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, UBA, Argentina)
  • Andreia Salgado (CEMIB, UNICAMP, Brazil)
  • Fernando Benavides (MD Anderson Cancer Center, Texas, USA)
  • Mariela Bollati (Institut Pasteur de Montevideo)
  • Martina Crispo (Institut Pasteur de Montevideo)

Here you can download a Poster for the 2011 Course. There are 2 slots reserved for ISTT Members. Additional information can be requested to: curso-genetica-raton@pasteur.edu.uy

Genome sequencing of 17 mouse inbred strains

Friday, September 16th, 2011
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Mouse genomic variation and its effect on phenotypes and gene regulation. Keane et al. Nature 2011, 289–294,  (15 September 2011), doi:10.1038/nature10413

Mouse genomic variation and its effect on phenotypes and gene regulation. Keane et al. Nature 2011, 289–294, (15 September 2011), doi:10.1038/nature10413

Most of our current understanding and genome research in mice has been based, so far, on the genome of the mouse inbred strain C57BL/6J, published in 2002 and accessible through a number of genome browsers, such as Ensembl. Yesterday, Keane et al. published in Nature the results of their sequencing efforts and the release of the genome sequences from 17 additional mouse inbred strains: C3H/HeJ, CBA/J, A/J, AKR/J, DBA/2J, LP/J, BALB/cJ, NZO/HlLtJ, NOD/ShiLtJ, 129S5SvEv<Brd>, 129P2/OlaHsd, 129S1/SvImJ, C57BL/6NJ, and the four wild-derived inbred strains CAST/EiJ, PWK/PhJ, WSB/EiJ and SPRET/EiJ. This is an enormous amount of information, obtained using next-generation sequencing, that these researchers from The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and other collaborating institutions now release to the public scientific community. Most of these inbred strains are very relevant in biomedical research and they are regularly used for the generation of genetically-modified mice. Notably, among them the C57BL/6NJ inbred strain, selected by the International KnockOut Mouse Consortium (IKMC) to produce the collection of systematic gene knockouts covering the entire mouse genome. This publication and the subsequent analyses derived from this study should greatly contribute to our understanding of the genetic diversity among different mouse strains and the different phenotypes that are often observed across inbred strains, associated with identical genetic modifications.

Early Bird Registration for TT2011 ends on July 31st !!!

Monday, July 25th, 2011
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Early Bird Registration for the TT2011 meeting ends on July 31st !!!

Early Bird Registration for the TT2011 meeting ends on July 31st !!!

Have you not yet registered for attending the 10th Transgenic Technology (TT2011) meeting? You can’t miss the best forum where to discuss the latest advances in animal transgenic technology, for the generation and the analyses of genetically-modified animals!. If you haven’t registered please don’t forget to do so by this next Sunday, July 31st, the announced deadline for early bird registration at reduced fees. Thereafter, and just before the meeting, to be held in Florida, on 24-26 October 2011, you still be able to register, though at slightly increased fees (+70 USD). Please, hurry up and don’t miss this opportunity to meet again all your colleagues from around the world, to openly discuss with them your problems and solutions in your daily work with transgenic animals. Hope to seeing you all in Florida!

Publication of the Academy of Medical Sciences Report on Animals containing human material

Friday, July 22nd, 2011
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Publication of the Academy of Medical Sciences Report on Animals containing human material

Publication of the Academy of Medical Sciences Report on Animals containing human material

The Academy of Medical Sciences has published the report of a working group study on ‘animals containing human material (ACHM)’ today.  The report was prepared by a working group, chaired by Professor Martin Bobrow CBE FRS FMedSci. The working group of experts included Prof. Robin Lovell-Badge (NIMR-MRC, UK), member of the International Society for Transgenic Technologies (ISTT). The Academy of Medical Sciences promotes advances in medical science and campaigns to ensure these are translated into healthcare benefits for society. The report examines the use of ACHM from scientific, social, ethical, safety and regulatory perspectives, and highlights how ACHM are used both in investigational research, and in the development and production of therapeutics. The study was informed by open call for evidence, expert evidence, and a commissioned public dialogue.
The report concludes that the majority of ACHM research does not pose ethical or regulatory difficulties, but identifies 3 areas that will need careful oversight in future:
  • Modification of an animal’s brain which might lead to human-like cognition;
  • Changing an animal so it has human appearance or characteristics (e.g. skin, facial or limb features, speech); and the
  • Development of human-derived sperm or eggs in an animal (especially if fertilisation may occur).
It recommendations include:
  • That the Home Office puts in place an expert oversight body, within the current system of animal research regulation, to oversee the most sensitive types of ACHM research.
  • Close alignment of several regulatory bodies that oversee aspects of ACHM research (particularly the Home Office and HFEA).
  • Raising international awareness of ACHM, promoting international consistency in research practice, and the development of international standards and guidance.
These recommendations should ensure that valuable and justifiable ACHM research can proceed within a robust, proportionate regulatory system, which is capable of responding to developing scientific knowledge and social attitudes, and which avoids undue bureaucracy and duplication of regulation.
The study was supported by the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills’ Sciencewise-ERC programme, the Department of Health, Medical Research Council, and Wellcome Trust. A report synopsis has been prepared by Dr Geoff Watts FMedSci.
Further information is available on The Academy of Medical Sciences website

Published in Nature: A conditional knockout resource for the genome-wide study of mouse gene function

Thursday, June 16th, 2011
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Targeting strategies and constructs used by KOMP-CSD and EUCOMM

Targeting strategies and constructs used by KOMP-CSD and EUCOMM

Today’s issue of Nature includes the article reporting the great initiative, efforts and results achieved so far by the International KnockOut Mouse Consortium (IKMC) towards the systematic gene-targeting of the mouse genome, aiming to functionally annotate and thus deciphering the precise role of all genes encoded by a mammalian genome (mouse), most similar to the human genome. The authors are members of the KOMP (the National Institutes of Health Knockout Mouse Program) and EUCOMM (the European Conditional Mouse Mutagenesis) international projects.

In this work, the authors report the establishment of a high-throughput gene-targeting efficient strategies and a successful pipeline to produce reporter-tagged, conditional alleles on an unprecedent scale. As they report, “more than 12,000 vectors and 9,000 conditional targeted alleles“ have been produced so far. Targeted ES cells and targeting vectors are available from KOMP and EUMMCR. Mice derived from EUCOMM ES cells are available as live animals or cryopreserved embryos from EMMA.

A conditional knockout resource for the genome-wide study of mouse gene function
William C. Skarnes, Barry Rosen, Anthony P. West, Manousos Koutsourakis, Wendy Bushell, Vivek Iyer, Alejandro O. Mujica, Mark Thomas, Jennifer Harrow, Tony Cox, David Jackson, Jessica Severin, Patrick Biggs, Jun Fu, Michael Nefedov, Pieter J. de Jong, A. Francis Stewart & Allan Bradley.  Nature 474 (337-342) Date published: 16 June 2011 DOI: doi:10.1038/nature10163

Additional comments available here.


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