Archive for the ‘genes’ Category

The TT2014 meeting web page has been launched: REGISTRATION IS OPEN!

Thursday, October 31st, 2013
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The TT2014 meeting web site has been launched. REGISTRATION IS OPEN!

The TT2014 meeting web site has been launched. REGISTRATION IS OPEN!

Today, the 12th Transgenic Technology (TT2014) meeting web site has been launched. And meeting registration is already open!. The TT2014 meeting is organized by ISTT members Douglas Strathdee-chair, Peter Hohenstein and Bruce Whitelaw and will be held at The Assembly Rooms, in Edinburgh, Scotland, UK, on 6-8 October 2014. Immediately following the TT2014 meeting, on October 9-10, 2014, there will be a hands-on practical workshop called ‘An Introduction to Zebrafish Transgenesis‘ which will focus on Zebrafish.  Further details about this practical workshop will be announced at the TT2014 meeting web site.

The meeting is hosted by three world-class Scottish research institutes and the University of Edinburgh: the Roslin Institute; the Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine and the Beatson Institute for Cancer Research. All three Institutes are world-renowned for producing top quality science at the forefront of biomedical research. The TT meeting visits the UK for the first time following the previous TT meetings in Guangzhou, China (TT2013); Florida, USA (TT2011); Berlin, Germany (TT2010); Toronto, Canada (TT2008); Brisbane, Australia (TT2007) and Barcelona, Spain (TT2005). This will be the 12th meeting in the series, originally pioneered by Johannes Wilbertz (Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden) in 1999. Since the foundation of the ISTT in 2006, the TT meetings have been the main event sponsored by the Society.

The following speakers have confirmed their participation at the TT2014 meeting:

  • David Adams, Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton, Cambridge UK
  • Ignacio Anegon, Center for Research in Transplantation and Immunology, Nantes, France
  • Stephen Ekker, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA
  • Kat Hadjatonakis, Developmental Biology Program, Sloan-Kettering Institute, New York, USA
  • Coenraad Hendriksen, Institute for Translational Vaccinology, Bilthoven, The Netherlands
  • Rudolf Jaenisch, Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, Nine Cambridge Center Cambridge, USA
  • Jos Jonkers, Division of Molecular Pathology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
  • Keith Joung, Molecular Pathology Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA, USA
  • Alex Joyner, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA
  • Koichi Kawakami, Division of Molecular and Developmental Biology, National Institute of Genetics, Shizuoka, Japan
  • Jim Murray, Department of Animal Science and Department of Population Health and Reproduction, University of California, Davis, California, USA
  • Stephen Murray, The Jackson Laboratory, Bar Harbor, Maine, USA
  • Lluis Montoliu, ISTT President, Organising Committee, National Center of Biotechnology (CNB), CSIC, Madrid, Spain
  • Vasilis Ntziachristos, Technische Universität Mu?nchen, Munich, Germany
  • Pawel Pelczar, Institute of Laboratory Animal Science, Zürich, Switzerland
  • Janet Rossant, The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Angelika Schnieke, Livestock Biotechnology, WZW Center of Life Science, Freising-Weihenstephan, Germany
  • Kai Schönig, Central Institute of Mental Health, Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany
  • Austin Smith, Wellcome Trust-Medical Research Council Stem Cell Institute, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
  • Sara Wells, MRC Harwell, Oxfordshire, UK
  • Jacqui White, Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton, Cambridge UK

At the TT2014 meeting, the ISTT will be awarding the 10th ISTT Prize for outstanding contributions to the field of transgenic technologies to Prof. Janet Rossant (The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada). The ISTT Prize is generously sponsored by genOway.

At the TT2014 meeting, the ISTT will be also awarding the 3rd ISTT Young Investigator Award, generously sponsored by inGenious Targeting Laboratory. The ISTT Young Investigator Award recognizes outstanding achievements by a young scientist who will keep the field of transgenic technologies vibrant with new ideas and who has recently received his or her advanced professional degree.

At the TT2014 meeting, and for the first time, the ISTT Best Poster Awards, traditionally awarded to the best posters presented at the corresponding TT meeting, will be generously sponsored by Charles River.

Accepted abstracts submitted for the TT2014 meeting, will be published in the scientific journal Transgenic Research (Springer), to which the ISTT is associated.

A minimum of six registration awards for ISTT members will be sponsored by the International Society for Transgenic Technologies. Applications should be sent, along with the registration document to istt@transtechsociety.org by June 30, 2014. Award decisions will be communicated by July 15, 2014 and awardees will receive a diploma at the TT2014 Meeting.

Important deadlines:

  • Abstract submission deadline June 30, 2014
  • Application for ISTT registration awards deadline June 30, 2014
  • Awards to be communicated by July 15, 2014
  • Early Bird registration fee deadline July 31, 2014
  • Standard Rate registration fee from August 1, 2014
  • Late & On-Site Rate registration fee from September 22, 2014

As it is stated in the TT2014 meeting home page: “Scotland prides itself on both its life science research and the warm welcome given to visitors and looks forward to hosting TT2014“. Therefore, on behalf of the ISTT and of the TT2014 Organising Committee we invite you all to attend to the TT2014 meeting.

See you all in Edinburgh!

Douglas Coleman and Jeffrey Friedman granted the 2012 BBVA Foundation Frontiers of Knowledge Award in Biomedicine

Tuesday, January 29th, 2013
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Douglas Coleman and Jeffrey Friedman granted the 2012 BBVA Foundation Frontiers of Knowledge Award in Biomedicine

Douglas Coleman and Jeffrey Friedman granted the 2012 BBVA Foundation Frontiers of Knowledge Award in Biomedicine

The 2012 BBVA Foundation Frontiers of Knowledge Award in Biomedicine has been granted to Douglas Coleman (retired, Professor Emeritus at The Jackson Laboratory, Bar Harbor, ME, USA) and Jeffrey Friedman (The Rockfeller University, USA) for “revealing the existence of the genes involved in the regulation of appetite and body weight, a discovery crucial to our understanding of human pathologies such as obesity,” as stated by the prize jury.

Jeffrey Friedman cloned the gene encoding leptin (Lep), as the mutation present in the obese mice (ob/ob), based on the ideas and previous work pioneered by Douglas Coleman, who also predicted that the mutant (db/db) mice affected a gene (Lepr) encoding the receptor for this important hormone, produced by adipose cells in the fat and acting in the brain to regulate food intake, energy expenditure and how much fat the body stores. This is yet another award and public recognition to mouse genetics, leading the discovery of genes and their functions, and illustrating how mice help to find out what the homologous human loci do, and their relevance in pathology when they are mutated.

Douglas Coleman and Jeffrey Friedman have been already granted the Shaw Prize in Life Science and Medicine, in 2009, and the Albert Lasker Basic Medical Research Award, in 2010, also jointly in both cases, for their discovery of leptin. Both scientists should be now congratulated, once again, for their excellent scientific work and this new award, truly deserved. Anyone interested to read about the scientific histories behind the discovery of leptin is welcome to read the following articles:

Leading the charge in leptin research: an interview with Jeffrey Friedman.
Friedman J. Dis Model Mech. 2012 Sep;5(5):576-9.

A historical perspective on leptin.
Coleman DL. Nat Med. 2010 Oct;16(10):1097-9.

The 2012 Jury for this BBVA Foundation Frontiers of Knowledge Award in Biomedicine comprises a number of eminent scientists including two researchers that are, in addition, ISTT members, namely: Robin Lovell-Badge, Head of the Division of Stem Cell Biology and Developmental Genetics at the National Institute for Medical Research (Medical Research Council, UK), acting as the Secretary of this Jury; and Bruce Whitelaw, Head of the Developmental Biology Division at The Roslin Institute in Edinburgh (UK) and Editor-in-Chief of Transgenic Research, the scientific journal to which the International Society for Transgenic Technologies (ISTT) is associated.

TALENs and ZFNs at the TT2013 meeting in China

Thursday, October 4th, 2012
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The crystal structure of TAL effector PthXo1 bound to its DNA target. Figure 2 from article by: Amanda Nga-Sze Mak, Philip Bradley,  Raul A. Cernadas, Adam J. Bogdanove and Barry L. Stoddard. Science. 2012 February 10; 335(6069): 716–719.
The crystal structure of TAL effector PthXo1 bound to its DNA target. Figure 2 from article by: Amanda Nga-Sze Mak, Philip Bradley, Raul A. Cernadas, Adam J. Bogdanove and Barry L. Stoddard. Science. 2012 February 10; 335(6069): 716–719.

Zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) and Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are two types of targeted nucleases generated by joining the restriction enzyme FokI DNA-endonuclease domain with modular DNA-binding units derived from Zinc-Finger domains or  TALE domains, respectively, thereby providing DNA sequence specificity for the double strand break (DSB). The endogenous cellular systems would then resolve this DSB, through the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) process, usually generating mutations around this DSB. Alternatively, a given DNA template with overlapping homology around the DSB may be also provided, resulting in the integration of new DNA sequences, through homologous recombination, according to the homology-driven repair (HDR) process. Combining the target specificity of these nucleases with NHEJ and HDR has allowed the generation of a new wave of transgenic animals carrying mutations at specific loci. These technical developments have probably changed, and certainly expanded, our view about how we can produce nowadays genetically-modified animals. 

The great expectation and interest in using ZFNs and TALENs, and their applications in animal transgenesis, will be discussed, extensively, in Guangzhou (China), at the next 11th Transgenic Technology (TT2013) meeting (25-27 February 2013), thanks to the various talks that will be delivered by our invited speakers on this subject.

The use of ZFNs for targeted mutagenesis in mice will be introduced by Dietmar Kappes (Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA, USA).

The use of ZFNs to produce mono-allelic knockout pigs will be presented by Liangxue Lai (Guangzhou Institutes of Biomedicine and Health, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou, PR China), based on a recent publication from his group:

Generation of PPAR-gamma mono-allelic knockout pigs via zinc-finger nucleases and nuclear transfer cloning.
Yang D, Yang H, Li W, Zhao B, Ouyang Z, Liu Z, Zhao Y, Fan N, Song J, Tian J, Li F, Zhang J, Chang L, Pei D, Chen YE, Lai L.
Cell Res. 2011 Jun;21(6):979-82.

The use of TALENs in zebrafish will be presented by Bo Zhang (College of Life Sciences, Peking University, Beijing, PR China) based on his recent developments:

Heritable gene targeting in zebrafish using customized TALENs.
Huang P, Xiao A, Zhou M, Zhu Z, Lin S, Zhang B.
Nat Biotechnol. 2011 Aug 5;29(8):699-700.

And, finally, livestock genome editing with TALENs will be presented by Scott Fahrenkrug (Center for Genome Engineering and Department of Animal Science, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN; and, Recombinetics, Inc., Minneapolis, MN, USA). Scott Fahrenkrug and his collaborators have just published two very interesting articles in PNAS and Nature describing the use of TALENs in bovine and swine embryos, and also devising new sets of TALENs for in vivo genome editing, using zebrafish.
 
Efficient TALEN-mediated gene knockout in livestock.
Carlson DF, Tan W, Lillico SG, Stverakova D, Proudfoot C, Christian M, Voytas DF, Long CR, Whitelaw CB, Fahrenkrug SC.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2012 Oct 1.
 
In vivo genome editing using a high-efficiency TALEN system.
Bedell VM, Wang Y, Campbell JM, Poshusta TL, Starker CG, Krug Ii RG, Tan W, Penheiter SG, Ma AC, Leung AY, Fahrenkrug SC, Carlson DF, Voytas DF, Clark KJ, Essner JJ, Ekker SC.
Nature. 2012 Sep 23. doi: 10.1038/nature11537.
 
Therefore, anyone interested in the latest advances on the use of ZFNs and TALENs in transgenic animals is warmly invited to register for the TT2013 meeting in China.

ENCODE: The hidden part of our genome has been revealed

Wednesday, September 5th, 2012
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Image: http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/notrocketscience/2012/09/05/encode-the-rough-guide-to-the-human-genome/

ENCODE: understanding how the genome works

The last issue of Nature (Vol. 489, Nr. 7414, 6 September 2012) includes the publication of a series of scientific articles from the ENCODE project, a major international collaborative effort started 10 years ago with the aim of understanding how genomes work and, in particular, how the human genome works. The published papers released today include additional manuscripts (up to 30 articles in 3 journals, all publicly accessible) from an impressive list of institutions and scientists that have worked, coordinately, and successfully, for this second big revision of the human genome, describing and deciphering the role and function of most of the DNA elements usually found between the genes, in the intergenic regions, which are rich in DNA regulatory elements that are fundamental for the correct expression of genes. As stated in Nature’s comment by Ewan Birney (EBI, Hinxton), the lead ENCODE analysis coordinator, the ENCODE project has built over the past 5 years “an encyclopaedia of functional DNA elements to be used as a reference for the scientific community“. Reading E. Birney’s comment is also an excellent manner to understand the complexities of the ENCODE project and how they managed to establish a structure and procedures to make such a large consortium a successful collaborative achievement.

The generation of transgenic animals with simple DNA constructs often results in suboptimal transgene expression. We also know that using genomic-type constructs (i.e. BACs or YACs) normally guarantees optimal transgene expression, because their larger size allows the inclusion of all/most DNA regulatory elements that are required for the correct expression of the gene/transgene of interest. ENCODE’s results list all these DNA regulatory elements. Whether enhancers, silencers, insulators, boundaries, repressors, binding sites for nuclear/transcription factors, etc… all these different types of DNA elements usually found in intergenic regions occupy most of our genome and, until recent years, had received less attention that the more famous coding regions. ENCODE’s results demonstrate the functional relevance of all these regulatory elements, often leading to human diseases when altered or mutated, and ultimately also explains why is so important to include them all, as many as possible, in our transgenic constructs, if we aim for optimal transgene expression, in order to recapitulate the expression pattern of the endogenous locus.

The release of ENCODE’s results represents a phenomenal advance in our understanding of the human genome and, likewise, provides the basis for the comprehension of other similar mammalian genomes, such as the mouse genome, as the animal experimental model commonly used in functional genetic analyses by other big consortia, aiming to define the function of mouse genes (and, hence, ours) by systematic knockout (IKMC) and phenotypic (IPMC) analyses.

The ENCODE project has primarily been funded by the National Human Genome Research Institute at the US National Institutes of Health.

The TT2013 meeting in China: progress and updated information

Friday, April 27th, 2012
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The TT2013 meeting in China: progress and updated information

The TT2013 meeting in China: progress and updated information

The organization of the 11th Transgenic Technology meeting (the TT2013 meeting), to be held in Guangzhou, PR China, on February 25-27, 2013,  is progressing well. Prof. Ming Zhao (Southern Medical University in Guangzhou), Chair of the TT2013 Organization, and all his colleagues in the various advisory and supporting committees, are doing a great job and, hence, from the International Society for Transgenic Technologies (ISTT) we are sure that the TT2013 meeting is going to be yet another great transgenic conference for all of us to learn, discuss and enjoy.  The preliminary TT2013 meeting web page already informs about the confirmed topics and speakers that will be in Guangzhou. These will be regularly updated as we receive the confirmations from all invited speakers. Registration is expected to be open in June. The registration scheme and registration fees will be similar to the previous TT2011 meeting. The TT2013 meeting will be followed by a 3-day practical hands-on course on basic techniques in transgenesis, coordinated by Dr. Wenhao Xu (University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA).

Currently, the confirmed topics and speakers attending the TT2013 meeting include:

Meeting Topics

  •  Sperm Cryopreservation and IVF
  • KOMP ES cell clones performance
  • Epigenetics and Transgenesis
  • Effects of in vitro culture on mammalian embryos
  • Targeted nucleases, ZFNs and TALENs, in transgenesis
  • Transgenic pigs and TALENs
  • Transgenic mice and ZFNs
  • KO pigs and ZFNs
  • Zebrafish and TALENs
  • Ethics, animal welfare and regulations
  • Health monitoring protocols and transgenic facilities
  • Non-rodent transgenesis
  • Primate chimeras and ES cells
  • Rat functional genomic initiatives
  • Animal models of human diseases
  • ES and iPS cells
  • transposon (PiggyBac)-mediated mutagenesis
  • Round-table discussion: Running a transgenic facility
  • Running a transgenic facility: The business aspect of running a transgenic unit
  • Running a transgenic facility: managing errors, difficulties
  • Running a transgenic facility: Staying on the cutting edge of technology while still maintaining basic services
  • Rat/mouse chimeras and iPS/ES cells
  • Overview of cre-transgenic mouse lines resources
  • China/Asia/Oceania in the International Mouse Functional Genomics Consortia
  •  3-days hands-on practical workshop on transgenesis procedures after the TT2013 meeting
  • ..

Confirmed Speakers

  • Allan Bradley (Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton/Cambridge, UK)
  • Alan Colman (Institute of Medical Biology, Singapore)
  • Scott Fahrenkrug (Recombinetics, Minneapolis, MN, USA)
  • Malcolm France (Sydney University, Sydney, Australia)
  • Xiang Gao (Model Animal Research Center of Nanjing University, Nanjing, PR China)
  • Alfonso Gutiérrez-Adán (Dep. Animal Reproduction, INIA, Madrid, Spain)
  • Yann Herault (Institut Clinique de la Souris, ICS and IGBMC, Illkirch/Strasbourg, France)
  • Dietmar Kappes (Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA, USA)
  • Liangxue Lai (Guangzhou Institute of Biomedicine and Health, Chinese Academy of Science, Guangzhou, PR China)
  • Kent Lloyd (University of California, Davis, CA, USA)
  • Shoukhrat Mitalipov (Oregon National Primate Research Center, OHSU, Beaverton, OR, USA)
  • Naomi Nakagata (Center for Animal Resources and Development, Kumamoto University, Japan)
  • Catheryn O’Brien (The Walter and Eliza Hall Institute, Melbourne, Australia)
  • Masaru Okabe (Genome Information Research Center Research, Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Osaka, Japan)
  • Jan Parker-Thornburg (MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA)
  • Ling Sun (Institute of Developmental Biology and Molecular Medicine, Fudan University, Shanghai, PR China)
  • Bo Zhang (College of Life Sciences, Peking University, Beijing, PR China)
  • Qi Zhou (The State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, PR China)

From the ISTT, as in previous TT meetings, we will also promote and support the participation of ISTT members by sponsoring several registration awards for ISTT Members. Deadline for submitting applications for these ISTT Registration Awards is October 15, 2012. Instructions to apply can be found at the corresponding web page of the ISTT web site.

Please, write down the dates of the TT2013 meeting: February 25-27, 2013, and make sure you don’t miss this conference!. See you all in China next year!

Genetic differences among C57BL/6 mouse strains available from the Mouse Phenome Database

Monday, April 9th, 2012
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Genetic differences among C57BL/6 mouse strains
Genetic differences among C57BL/6 mouse strains

The Mouse Phenome Database (MPD), at the Jackson laboratory web site, has recently updated their list of SNP polymorphisms for closely related strains across the entire mouse genome. The premade lists, genome-wide, ready-to-use, now include three NEW comparisons containing all currently known genetic differences (SNPs) among C57BL/6 strains, particularly between C57BL/6J and C57BL/6N mouse strains, and their related substrains (entire genome occurrences).

  1. (coding and UTR regions only, 4341 SNPs)

  2. C57BL/6J versus C57BL/6NJ (all available SNPs that are polymorphic, 152001 SNPs)
  3. 13 C57BL/6 mouse related strains, J and N, including: C57BL/6J, C57BL/6ByJ, C57BL/6JArc, C57BL/6JBomTac, C57BL/6JCrl, C57BL/6JEiJ, C57BL/6JOlaHsd, C57BL/6JRccHsd, C57BL/6NCrl, C57BL/6NHsd, C57BL/6NJ, C57BL/6NNIH, C57BL/6NTac

The entire community of researchers in biomedicine using mouse genetics greatly appreciates the most useful service and helpful web resources provided by the MPD team. Thanks a lot colleagues!

World Map of Transgenic Core Facilities

Saturday, April 7th, 2012
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World Map of Transgenic Core Facilities

World Map of Transgenic Core Facilities

At the International Society for Transgenic Technologies (ISTT) web site, according to the aims of our Society. we care to provide the entire scientific community with as much information as possible regarding how and where to generate genetically modified animals, particularly transgenic and knockout mice, as useful animal models for research projects in biology, biotechnology and biomedicine. One of these resources of information is the World Map of Transgenic Core Facilities, currently holding more than 125 links to web sites of transgenic core facilities located in 27 countries, world wide. The transgenic core facilities can be easily found in a list, arranged per country, or using a useful Google Maps built-in feature depicting the geographic location of each transgenic facility.

Is your transgenic core facility not yet listed in the World Map of Transgenic Core Facilities offered from the ISTT web site? No problem. Whether public or private, whether based on an academic environment or associated with a company, all transgenic core facilities, all initiatives meant to produce transgenic animals (mice, rats, other mammals, other vertebrates,…) on demand, for research purposes, are welcome and we, at the ISTT, will be pleased to include all these links in our web site. Please contact us at istt@transtechsociety.org and send us your web link and contact details of your transgenic core facility and we will be more than happy to add your transgenic core facility to the list of World Map of Transgenic Core Facilities.

Thanks for submitting the web site of your Transgenic Core Facility to the ISTT.

EMMA Cryopreservation Workshop, Madrid, Spain, 7-8 May 2012

Thursday, February 16th, 2012
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EMMA Cryopreservation Workshop, Madrid, Spain, 7-8 May 2012

EMMA Cryopreservation Workshop, Madrid, Spain, 7-8 May 2012

The International Society for Transgenic Technologies (ISTT) co-sponsors the EMMA Cryopreservation Workshop, organized by EMMA (the European Mouse Mutant Archive) and CSIC (the Spanish Research Council) and to be held at the CSIC Main Campus, in Madrid (Spain), on 7-8 May 2012. The Organizers of this workshop are Martin Fray (Mammalian Genetics Unit, MRC, Harwell, UK; Biological Resources Manager at the EMMA node in MRC-MGU-Harwell and ISTT Member), Michael Hagn (Institute of Experimental Genetics, HMGU, Munich, Germany; EMMA Project Manager) and Lluis Montoliu (National Center of Biotechnology, CNB-CSIC, Madrid, Spain; Spanish EMMA node co-ordinator and ISTT Member).  The Organizers have selected a number of speakers in the field and hot topics in cryopreservation with a main focus on technology. The main aim of this workshop is to discuss openly all topics at length and in depth, from past and present initiatives, undertaken by the various archiving initiatives world-wide, invited to this workshop, to the current and future challenges all bio-repositories have to face and address adequately. Topics that will be discussed include: embryo and organ cryopreservation, sperm cryopreservation and IVF, ICSI, mouse production, morula/ES aggregation method, transportation issues with frozen and unfrozen biological material and various continental efforts towards cryopreservation. Additional information can be obtained from workshop web site.

Confirmed invited participants include:

  • Sue Bath (Melbourne, Australia)
  • Martina Crispo (Institut Pasteur, Montevideo, Uruguay)
  • Xiang Gao (Model Animal Research Center, Nanjing University, Nanjing, P.R. China)
  • Marina Gertsenstein (Toronto Centre for Phenogenomics, Toronto, ON, Canada)
  • Alan Hart (MRC-Human Genetics Unit at MRC/IGMM, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK)
  • Jean Jaubert (Institut Pasteur, Paris, France)
  • Carlisle Landel (Thomas Jefferson University, Kimmel Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA, USA)
  • Kent Lloyd (Mouse Biology Program, University of California, Davis, CA, USA)
  • Peter Mazur (The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, USA)
  • Keiji Mochida (RIKEN Bioresource Center, Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki, Japan)
  • Pedro Moreira (European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Monterotondo/Rome, Italy)
  • Naomi Nakagata (Center for Animal Resources & Development-CARD, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, Japan)
  • Lauryl Nutter (Toronto Centre for Phenogenomics, Toronto, ON, Canada)
  • Atsuo Ogura (RIKEN Bioresource Center, Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki, Japan)
  • Sagrario Ortega (National Cancer Research Center, CNIO-ISCIII, Madrid, Spain)
  • Belén Pintado (National Center of Biotechnology, CNB-CSIC, Madrid, Spain)
  • Marcello Raspa (EMMA-CNR, Monterotondo/Rome, Italy)
  • Stuart Read (The Australian National University, The Australian Phenomics Facility, Canberra, Australia)
  • Jorge Sztein (CMB Cryopreservation and Assisted Reproduction, NIAID-NIH, Rockville, MD, USA)
  • Rob Taft (The Jackson Laboratory, Bar Arbor, ME, USA)
  • Toru Takeo (Center for Animal Resources & Development-CARD, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, Japan)
  • Xavier Warot (Center of PhenoGenomics, School of Life Sciences, EPFL, Lausanne, Switzerland)
  • Michael Wiles (The Jackson Laboratory, Bar Arbor, ME, USA)

In addition, the EMMA Cryopreservation workshop will be attended by delegates from EMMA nodes and up to ten (10) current* ISTT members selected among applicants with expertise in cryopreservation, on behalf of the EMMA-ISTT cooperation agreement, for mutual promotion and collaboration, currently in place, and thanks to the specific co-sponsorship of the ISTT agreed by the ISTT council for this EMMA workshop. This is a highly specialized workshop with about 60 participants, all attending by invitation. However, up to ten ISTT members with expertise in cryopreservation will be able to benefit and attend. ISTT members interested and willing to attend this meeting can submit their applications to Lluis Montoliu (montoliu@cnb.csic.es), including a CV and a letter describing how the applicant will benefit from attending the workshop, but also how the applicant will be able to contribute to discussions. Applications should be sent by email to Lluis Montoliu by February 29th, 2012. Thereafter, Organizers will review all received applications and select up to ten ISTT Members with expertise in cryopreservation. All invited participants will be encouraged to actively take part in all discussions throughout the meeting. There is no registration fee for this workshop. Selected ISTT members will be entitled to one night accommodation (7 to 8 May 2012) on behalf of the Organization of this workshop. All participants will be invited to the official Workshop dinner on May 7.

Also, in an effort to disseminate the outcome of this workshop among interested colleagues, the Organizers will make the workshop abstracts, submitted by invited speakers, and some/all of speakers’ slides available on the public EMMA and ISTT web sites, after obtaining the specific permission to share material from each invited speaker.

(*) current ISTT members are those registered/renewed in 2012.

ISTT co-sponsors Course on Managing Mouse Colonies: Genetics, Breeding & Welfare (6-8 June 2012, WTGC, Hinxton, UK)

Thursday, January 12th, 2012
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ISTT co-sponsors Course on Managing Mouse Colonies: Genetics, Breeding & Welfare (6-8 June 2012, WTGC, Hinxton, UK)

ISTT co-sponsors Course on Managing Mouse Colonies: Genetics, Breeding & Welfare (6-8 June 2012, WTGC, Hinxton, UK)

The International Society for Transgenic Technology (ISTT) is most pleased to announce the co-sponsorship of the 2012 Edition of the popular training Course on Managing Mouse Colonies: Genetics, Breeding & Welfare, organized as a collaborative effort by four institutions: MRC Harwell, the Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, the RSPCA Transgenic Training Working Group (TTWG) and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute. The course will be held at the Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge, UK, on June 6-8 June 2012. Registration deadline: 29 February 2012. ISTT members are entitled to a reduced registration fee.

This training Course aims to introduce experienced technicians and scientific staff involved with the management of  genetically-modified mouse colonies to best practice with respect to the 3Rs and animal welfare. The programme covers historical and current best practice in the maintenance of genetically-modified mouse colonies for scientific research and the differing disciplines involved in production, phenotyping and archiving. Topics covered will include: Topics covered will include: nomenclature, basic colony management, maintaining transgenic and gene-targeted lines, breeding for experimental purposes and maintenance of high health status colonies.

Scientific organisers
James Bussell Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, UK, ISTT member
Neil Dear Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, UK
Nikki Osborne RSPCA, UK
Sara Wells Medical Research Council, Harwell, UK

Keynote speakers
Karen Steel Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, UK
Ian Jackson Medical Research Council Human Genetics Unit, UK

Confirmed tutors
James Bussell Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, UK, ISTT member
Neil Dear Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, UK
Adrian Deeny University College London, UK
Martin Fray Medical Research Council, Harwell, UK, ISTT member
Richard Houghton Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, UK, ISTT Member
Natasha Karp Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, UK
Nikki Osborne RSPCA, UK
Sara Wells Medical Research Council, Harwell, UK
Jacqui White Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, UK
Ben Woodman Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, UK


Report from the 2011 Course on Rodents Genetics at Institut Pasteur-Montevideo

Friday, December 30th, 2011
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Report from the 2011 Course on Rodents Genetics at Institut Pasteur-Montevideo

Report from the 2011 Course on Rodents Genetics at Institut Pasteur-Montevideo

The second edition of the International Course on “Genetics of Laboratory Rodents” was held at the Institut Pasteur-Montevideo, Uruguay, from December 5 to 14, 2011, with the co-sponsorization of the International Society for Transgenic Technologies (ISTT). This course was organized by Martina Crispo, DVM – Head of the Transgenic and Experimental Animal Unit – Institut Pasteur de Montevideo, Uruguay, and ISTT Member, and co-organized by Jean Jacques Panthier, PhD – Unité de Genetique Fonctionelle de la Souris – Institut Pasteur, France. The teaching team was composed by Scientists from the Institut Pasteur in Paris and Montevideo as well as other regional and international institutions, who are familiar with the topics, including several ISTT Members (Jean Jaubert, Fernando Benavides, Ignacio Anegon). Students (20 participants, coming from Argentina, Chile, Brazil, Netherlands and Uruguay) were carefully selected among a long list of candidates. Again, as in its first edition, organized in 2008, this course was a very successful event, both from the scientific and social points of view, allowing more than 30 researchers from different countries to spent together ten days for science discussion. Furthermore, all students received credits for their curricula, meaning that this course will be considered as a significant element of their MSc or PhD programs. A full scientific course report is available from the ISTT web site. The ISTT wishes to thank Martina Crispo and her team from the Institut Pasteur de Montevideo, along with the rest of organizers and teachers participating, for succesfully running the second edition of this educational initiative on Laboratory Rodents Genetics in South-America.


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