Archive for the ‘transgenic’ Category

More than 27,000 messages on animal transgenesis available to ISTT members through ISTT_list and tg-l archives

Sunday, February 9th, 2014
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More than 27,000 messages on animal transgenesis available through ISTT_list and tg-l archives

More than 27,000 messages on animal transgenesis available through ISTT_list and tg-l archives

One of the most important assets of the International Society for Transgenic Technologies (ISTT), is the amount of information on animal transgenesis accummulated through the archives of the ISTT_list and tg-l email lists. Currently, more than 27,000 messages are fully available to ISTT members, conveniently organized in searchable and dynamic archives. The traditional transgenic-list (tg-l), operative since 1996 and offered from the ISTT web server since the end of 2011, has distributed over 22,000 messages since then, whereas the ISTT_list, associated and born with our Society in 2006, has disseminated some 5,000 messages, discussing both lists on almost each and every topic, issue or situation related directly or indirectly with animal transgenesis. All this endless information resource is fully available to ISTT members, through powerful search engines. Non-ISTT members subscribing to tg-l have access only to the most recent messages distributed through the tg-l, using the simple search engine, which allows simple searches and outputs the 50 most recent messages discussed on the subject of interest. In contrast, ISTT members have access to more sophysticated searching engines and the output always contains all messages archived on the matter investigated.

Obtaining granted access to these rich sources of information is very easy and cheap. Simply apply for ISTT membership! Submit now your application to become a member of the ISTT and you will get immediate and full access to all these messages.

Workshop report: animals bred, but not used in experiments

Wednesday, October 23rd, 2013
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Workshop:  “Animals bred, but not used in experiments”, October 18-20, 2013, Hotel Duin & Kruidberg, Santpoort, the Netherlands (Picture kindly provided by Fernando Benavides)

Workshop: “Animals bred, but not used in experiments”, October 18-20, 2013, Hotel Duin & Kruidberg, Santpoort, the Netherlands (Picture kindly provided by Fernando Benavides)

Workshop: “Animals bred, but not used in experiments”, October 18-20, 2013, Hotel Duin & Kruidberg, Santpoort, the Netherlands.

Experiments in biomedical science use large numbers of laboratory animals. It is a fact that to provide these animals, regularly more animals are bred than are finally used in the experiments planned. The Ministry of Economic Affairs as the competent body of the Netherlands had asked Prof. Coenraad Hendriksen and Dr. Jan-Bas Prins to organize a workshop to identify the reasons for the breeding of surplus animals and to devise recommendations as to how the number of animals that are bred but not used can be reduced to a minimum.

A number of experts from different fields of laboratory animal science were invited for a two day workshop to the Hotel Duin & Kruidberg in Santpoort, a town close to Amsterdam, to discuss these issues and to develop a paper for the Dutch authorities. Obviously, many of the laboratory animals bred are genetically altered (GA) animals. Moreover, techniques to cryopreserve GA animal lines could be a means to reduce the number of animals that are bred. The invitation was therefore extended to the ISTT to send a representative to take part in this workshop.

Here, I will give a short summary of the topics that have been discussed and of the outcomes. However, I refer you to the final report of the workshop, parts of which have been developed within individual small workgroups and will be put together into a final document by the kind efforts of Coenraad and Jan-Bas. I will inform you immediately upon the publication of this report.

A topic central to the discussion was the identification of reasons for the production of animals that are then not used in experiments. A major reason for this is the production of unwanted sexes and unwanted genotypes. The participants agreed that good planning can considerably reduce the number of surplus animals. At the same time, resources can be saved and either used for additional experiments or for cost reduction. However, breeding schemes with multiple alleles, as well as the organization of a facility, can be complex. A strong need for counseling as well as education of users of laboratory animals was identified, to make them competent to plan accordingly. The centralization of the breeding colonies under the responsibility of the facility management was discussed as a possibility to streamline breeding strategies. On the other hand, for the time being, this does not seem to be feasible for very many facilities. Local Animal Welfare Committees should evaluate local SOPs and develop a catalogue of best practices to help keep surplus animals to a minimum. GA animal lines should be cryopreserved immediately after their creation when there is no need to breed extra animals for this purpose and when animals from test rederivations can be used for experiments or for the breeding colony. Thereby, the lines are protected from disaster and from genetic drift at the same time, live mice can be terminated at any time, and the lines can be easily shipped to collaborators. Lines should be made available to collaborators as early as possibly to avoid generating the same line at different places. In case expertise for cryopreservation is lacking, lines can be donated to repositories like EMMA where they are cryopreserved free of charge. Investigators should always consider sharing lines with the scientific community through such repositories.

A second important topic discussed during the workshop was the use of new technologies for the generation of GA animals as well as for their experimental analysis. New lines should be directly generated on the desired background. In case backcrossing is needed, speed congenic strategies should be used to reduce the number of animals needed during that process. Technologies utilizing the targeting of nucleases to the locus of interest (ZFNs, TALENs, CRISPER/Cas9) promise to eventually allow the generation of GA lines with reduced numbers of animals directly on the desired background. Complex strategies for the generation of customized animals for specific experiments were presented. It was agreed that these should be freely available. However, individual scientists and institutes should evaluate whether it is worth adopting a new and complicated technique. Since the process of setting up complex protocols may well lead to the use of high numbers of animals, investigators should consider collaborating with colleagues who perform similar experiments at large scales.

Ethical considerations let us come to the understanding that there is an intrinsic value of life. We found that it is for this reason that it is morally wrong to kill more animals than absolutely necessary. Biomedical science is tasked with producing answers to pressing questions on the molecular functions of life and disease and finding new cures. It was pointed out that the principles of the 3R’s have to be respected at all times, but a number of animal experiments are indispensable. In this context, it is unavoidable to breed animals that are not used for these experiments, but it is important to ensure that their numbers are kept to a minimum.

Boris Jerchow
Member of ISTT’s Executive Council
October 23, 2013

List of participants and affiliations, excluding those who were unable to send permission for disclosure:

van der Broek, Frank, NVWA, The Netherlands; Aleström, Peter, The Norwegian Zebrafish Platform, Norway; Benavides, Fernando, University of Texas, USA*; Bussell, James, Wellcom Trust Sanger Institute, UK*; Chrobot, Nichola, MRC Harwell, UK; van Es, Johan, Hubrecht University, The Netherlands; Fentener van Vlissingen, Martje, Erasmus MC, The Netherlands; Hendriksen, Coenraad, InTraVacc, The Netherlands; Hohenstein, Peter, Roslin Intitute, UK*; Krimpenfort, Paul, NKI, The Netherlands; Morton, David, UK; Prins, Jan-Bas, LUMC, The Netherlands; Raspa, Marcello, EMMA, Italy*; Tramper, Ronno, Consultant, The Netherlands; van der Valk, Jan, NKCA; Wilbertz, Johannes, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden*; Ohl, Frauke, Utrecht University, The Netherlands; Pool, Chris, KNAW, The Netherlands; Witler, Lars, Max-Planck Institute Mol. Gen., Berlin, Germany*.

* ISTT members

Workshop: “Animals bred, but not used in experiments”, October 18-20, 2013, Hotel Duin & Kruidberg, Santpoort, the Netherlands (Picture kindly provided by Fernando Benavides)

Workshop: “Animals bred, but not used in experiments”, October 18-20, 2013, Hotel Duin & Kruidberg, Santpoort, the Netherlands (Picture kindly provided by Fernando Benavides)

First transgenic rabbits born in Turkey

Monday, August 19th, 2013
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First transgenic rabbits born in Turkey

First transgenic rabbits born in Turkey

ISTT member Gul Bakirer, from the University of Istambul, informed us about the first transgenic rabbits born in Turkey, as the result of an international research project where she has collaborated. These genetically-modified rabbits were produced by pronuclear microinjection of a DNA hyperactive transposon carrying the green-fluorescent protein reporter gene. This is a collaborative research project led by Prof. Sema Birler (Istanbul University, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Reproduction and Artificial Insemination) involving up to 13 researchers, research assistants and PhD students from two universities in Turkey (Istambul and Marmara), as well as two researchers from the Hawai’i University Manoa John A. Burns School of Medicine (Stephan Moisyadi, former ISTT member and Associate Professor at the UH Institute for Biogenesis Research [IBR] and Joel Marh, IBR Transgenic Facility Director). Emeritus Professor Ryuzo Yanagimachi, the founder of IBR, and Stefan Moisyadi travelled to Istanbul in November 2011 to set up the collaboration with the University of Istanbul and Marmara University. Stefan Moisyadi and Joel Marh returned to Istanbul this past June to further assist their collaborators in Turkey for the successful generation of these transgenic rabbits. The aim of the experiment was to show that the transposon-transgenes devised in Hawai’i could also be used in rabbits, as a first step towards the generation of additional transgenic rabbits producing proteins of interest in their milk. Two of the eight rabbits obtained in the litter (25%) were found to shine fluorescent green, and hence to be transgenic. Additional ongoing experiments, by the same Hawai’i-Turkish collaborative effort, are expected to produce similar transgenic sheep soon.

Some of the researchers from the Istambul University involved in this achievement. From left to right: Ramazan Arici (PhD student), Ayse Can (PhD student), Prof. Sema Birler (coordinator of this study) and Prof. Serhat Alkan.

Some of the researchers from the Istambul University involved in this achievement. From left to right: Ramazan Arici (PhD student), Ayse Can (PhD student), Prof. Sema Birler (coordinator of this study) and Prof. Serhat Alkan.

Numerous ISTT events in June 2013

Thursday, May 30th, 2013
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Numerous ISTT events in June 2013

Numerous ISTT events in June 2013

The International Society for Transgenic Technologies (ISTT) will be participating and/or co-sponsoring numerous events during the month of June 2013. At first, on June 7, 2013, our ISTT colleagues from Nantes (France), Ignacio Anegon and Séverine Ménoret, experts in the generation of transgenic rats, will be holding their 2013 Nantes Transgenic meeting on “Technical advances in the generation of transgenic animals and in their applications“. Next, on June 10-13, 2013, in Barcelona (Spain), the 12th FELASA-SECAL congress will take place, where the ISTT will be participating in two ways. First, the ISTT will co-sponsor the satellite workshop on Mouse Sperm Cryopreservation, to be held within the 2013 FELASA meeting, on 10 June 2013, Barcelona, Spain, and organized by ISTT members Jorge Sztein (NIH, USA) and Jesús Martínez-Palacio (CIEMAT, Madrid, Spain). Second, the ISTT will be participating as exhibitor and will attend the 2013 FELASA meeting. The ISTT will have a booth in Barcelona (#230), manned by the ISTT administrative assistant, Alison Cameron, and where all ISTT members (and non-ISTT members) are welcome to visiting us. Finally, immediately next, our ISTT colleagues from The Netherlands, Marian Van Roon (VU, Amsterdam) and Sjef Verbeek (LUMC, Leiden), have organized their 2013 Workshop on Innovative Mouse Models (IMM2013). This 7th Workshop on Innovative Mouse Models will be held on 13-14 June 2013, at the Leiden University Medical Center, LUMC, Leiden, The Netherlands, and the ISTT will be co-sponsoring also this event. ISTT members will be entitled to reduced registrations at all these events, proudly co-sponsored by the ISTT.

First transgenic sheep made in SouthAmerica announced in Uruguay by ISTT members

Friday, April 26th, 2013
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Members of the team at IRAUy, led by A. Menchaca, and collaborators from Inst. Pasteur, led by M. Crispo, are holding several baby lambs (Photo by J. Calvelo)

Members of the team at IRAUy, led by A. Menchaca, and collaborators from Inst. Pasteur, led by M. Crispo, are holding several baby lambs (Photo by J. Calvelo)

Researchers at the Institute of Animal Reproduction in Uruguay (IRAUy), led by Alejo Menchaca (ISTT Member), in collaboration with members of the Transgenic and Experimental Animal Unit (UATE) of the Institut Pasteur de Montevideo, led by Martina Crispo (ISTT Member) and Ignacio Anegon‘s laboratory (ISTT Member), of the Transgenic Rats common facility, ITERT, INSERM, Nantes, France, working in Europe but born in Uruguay, have announced the generation of several green transgenic sheep made with lentiviruses carrying a GFP reporter transgene. These green animals represent the first transgenic sheep produced in Uruguay, and in SouthAmerica. According to the press release and the authors of this biotechnological project, up to nine transgenic sheep were generated last year, 6 months ago, at the IRAUy, after 2 years of work.

Green (GFP) transgenic sheep generated in Uruguay through a scientific collaboration involving the teams of Alejo Menchaca, Martina Crispo and Ignacio Anegon (Photo by J. Calvelo)

Green (GFP) transgenic sheep generated in Uruguay through a scientific collaboration involving the teams of Alejo Menchaca, Martina Crispo and Ignacio Anegon (Photo by J. Calvelo)

This proof-of-concept experiment demonstrates the technological skills and capacity of these teams and institutions in Uruguay, who have been able to produce these first transgenic lambs, and hence, they must be praised by their achievement. In the future, additional genetically modified livestock will be created, aiming to produce recombinant proteins of biomedical or industrial interest in the milk of these transgenic animals, following similar experiments already carried out in other countries. The International Society for Transgenic Technologies (ISTT) is proud to count among its members these three excellent researchers and wishes to congratulate them for their success in their experiments.

First GFP transgenic sheep produced in Uruguay and SouthAmerica (Photo by J. Calvelo)

First GFP transgenic sheep produced in Uruguay and SouthAmerica (Photo by J. Calvelo)

 The most immediate precedents for genetically modified livestock in SouthAmerica include transgenic goats generated in 2009 by the team of Vicente Freitas (ISTT Member) at the State University of Ceará, Fortaleza (Brazil), expressing hG-CSF in their milk, and several transgenic cows generated by a biotech firm, Biosidus, and by INTA, in Argentina, in 2008 and 2011, respectively, producing therapeutical proteins in their milk.

In memoriam: Frank Ruddle

Friday, March 15th, 2013
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Francis (Frank) Ruddle (from Yale Univ. web site, picture by Michael Marsland)

Francis (Frank) Ruddle (from Yale Univ. web site, picture by Michael Marsland)

Yale scientist Francis Hugh (Frank) Ruddle, a pioneer in genetic engineering and the study of developmental genetics, died March 10 in New Haven. He was 83 years old“. This is how a text in memoriam of Frank Ruddle, who passed away last Sunday, begins, at the Yale University web site. Frank Ruddle was Professor Emeritus at the Department of Molecular and Developmental, Yale University. In collaboration with Jon W. Gordon, from the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York, at the time one of his post-docs, Frank Ruddle devised and succeeded in creating the first transgenic mice, the first animals genetically modified after microinjecting a plasmid DNA into the pronuclei of fertilized mouse eggs. These seminal papers were published in 1980 and 1981. In order to remember Frank Ruddle’s pioneer contributions to the field of transgenic technologies, to highlight the relevance of their findings among our youngest colleagues, and to adequately assess, in perspective, their fantastic achievements, made more than 30 years ago (or only 30 years ago, depending how you would like to see the case) I am citing here the full abstracts, as they appear published in their respective journals, PNAS (in 1980) and Science (in 1981).

Genetic transformation of mouse embryos by microinjection of purified DNA.
Gordon JW, Scangos GA, Plotkin DJ, Barbosa JA, Ruddle FH.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1980 Dec;77(12):7380-4.

ABSTRACT: “A recombinant plasmid composed of segments of herpes simplex virus and simian virus 40 viral DNA inserted into the bacterial plasmid pBR322 was microinjected into pronuclei of fertilized mouse oocytes. The embryos were implanted in the oviducts of pseudopregnant females and allowed to develop to term. DNA from newborn mice was evaluated by the Southern blotting technique for the presence of DNA homologous to the injected plasmid. Two of 78 mice in one series of injections showed clear homology, though the injected sequences had been rearranged. Band intensities from the two positive mice were consistent with the presence of donor DNA in most or all of the cells of the newborns. These results demonstrate that genes can be introduced into the mouse genome by direct insertion into the nuclei of early embryos. This technique affords the opportunity to study problems of gene regulation and cell differentiation in a mammalian system by application of recombinant DNA technology.”

Integration and stable germ line transmission of genes injected into mouse pronuclei.
Gordon JW, Ruddle FH.
Science. 1981 Dec 11;214(4526):1244-6.

ABSTRACT: “Genetic material has been successfully transferred into the genomes of newborn mice by injection of that material into pronuclei of fertilized eggs. Initial results indicated two patterns of processing the injected DNA: one in which the material was not integrated into the host genome, and another in which the injected genes became associated with high molecular weight DNA. These patterns are maintained through further development to adulthood. The evidence presented indicates the covalent association of injected DNA with host sequences, and transmission of such linked sequences in a Mendelian distribution to two succeeding generations of progeny.”

In summary, they injected some heterologous DNA into the pronuclei of fertilized mouse eggs. This DNA was eventually covalently associated with the host DNA (integrated) and was also successfully transmitted to the progeny of the resulting genetically-modified mice (transgenic), therefore it was inherited as a new DNA piece, a new genetic trait, thereby creating a new mouse strain, a new animal model, a trangenic mouse. Isn’t that splendid and beautifully simple? Indeed, but someone had to envisage first the experiment, someone had to carry out the injections successfully. Someone was first in demonstating this was actually possible. This was Frank Ruddle.

On behalf of the International Society for Transgenic Technologies (ISTT) I want to express my most sincere condolences to his family, colleagues and friends. This is a great loss for the transgenic community.

Updated program for the TT2013 meeting in China

Monday, January 14th, 2013
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Updated program for the TT2013 meeting in China

Updated program for the TT2013 meeting in China

The International Society for Transgenic Technologies (ISTT) is pleased to announce the latest updated scientific program for the 11th Transgenic Technology (TT2013) meeting, which will be held in Guangzhou, China, on February 25-27, 2013, followed by a 3-day hands-on practical workshop on basic microinjection techniques, on February 28-March 2, 2013. The TT2013 Meeting is organized by Prof. Ming Zhao (Southern Medical University, Guangzhou) and will be held at the Guangzhou Baiyun International Convention Center. The associated hands-on workshop is organized by Dr. Wenhao Xu (University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA) in collaboration with Prof. Liangping Li (Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China), Prof. Jing An (Cancer Institute, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China) and Prof. Ming Zhao.  The practical workshop will be held at the Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou. Submission of late abstracts will be still accepted until January 24, 2013. Standard Registration fees apply until January 31, 2013. Registration to attend the TT2013 meeting should be done through the TT2013 meeting web site. Please register soon to attend the 2013 Edition of this world reference conference-series on animal transgenic technology.

The updated TT2013 program includes the following confirmed invited speakers:

  • Fernando Benavides (MD Anderson Cancer Center, Smithville, TX, USA)
  • Allan Bradley (Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton/Cambridge, UK) ISTT Prize
  • James Bussell (Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton/Cambridge, UK)
  • Shannon Byers (The Jackson Laboratory, Bar Harbor, ME, USA)
  • Michael Dobbie (Australian Phenomics Facility, The Australian National University, Canberra, Australia)
  • Scott Fahrenkrug (Recombinetics, Minneapolis, MN, USA)
  • Malcolm France (Sydney, Australia)
  • Xiang Gao (Model Animal Research Center of Nanjing University, Nanjing, PR China)
  • Alfonso Gutiérrez-Adán (Dep. Animal Reproduction, INIA, Madrid, Spain)
  • Yann Herault (Institut Clinique de la Souris, ICS and IGBMC, Illkirch/Strasbourg, France)
  • Benoît Kanzler (Max-Planck Institute of Immunobiology and Epigenetics, Freiburg, Germany)
  • Dietmar Kappes (Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA, USA)
  • Takashi Kohda (Department of Epigenetics, Medical Research Institute, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Japan)
  • Thomas Kolbe (Biomodels Austria and Institute for Biotechnology in Animal Production, IFA-Tulln, Austria)
  • Takashi Kuramoto (Institute of Laboratory Animals, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan)
  • Liangxue Lai (Guangzhou Institute of Biomedicine and Health, Chinese Academy of Science, Guangzhou, PR China)
  • Jinsong Li (Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, PR China)
  • Ning Li (State Key Laboratories for Agrobiotechnology, China Agricultural University, Beijing, PR China)
  • Depei Liu (Chinese Academy of Medical Science and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, PR China) TT2013 Opening Lecture
  • Pentao Liu (Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton/Cambridge, UK)
  • Kent Lloyd (University of California, Davis, CA, USA)
  • Kyle D. Lutes (Department of Computer and Information Technology-CIT Faculty, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, USA)
  • Shoukhrat Mitalipov (Oregon National Primate Research Center, OHSU, Beaverton, OR, USA)
  • Naomi Nakagata (Center for Animal Resources and Development, Kumamoto University, Japan)
  • Catheryn O’Brien (The Walter and Eliza Hall Institute, Melbourne, Australia)
  • Masaru Okabe (Genome Information Research Center Research, Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Osaka, Japan)
  • Jan Parker-Thornburg (MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA)
  • Xin-an Pu (The Ohio State University, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, OH, USA)
  • Toru Takeo (Center for Animal Resources and Development, Kumamoto University, Japan) ISTT Young Investigator Award
  • Zhu-Gang Wang (Shanghai Research Center for Model Organisms, Shanghai, PR China)
  • Guoliang Xu (Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, PR China)
  • Bo Zhang (College of Life Sciences, Peking University, Beijing, PR China)
  • Qi Zhou (The State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, PR China)

Transgenic salmon: one step closer to the market

Sunday, December 30th, 2012
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AquAdvantage salmon grows faster than non-transgenic Atlantic salmon (source: AquaBounty Technologies)

AquAdvantage salmon grows faster than non-transgenic Atlantic salmon (source: AquaBounty Technologies)

The famous faster-growing transgenic salmon AquAdvantage, produced by the biotechnology company AquaBounty Technologies (Maynard, MA, USA), might see eventually its path cleared to the US market in year 2013, 24 years after it was originally generated (in 1989) and 18 years after the company initiated its application for commercialization (in 1995). This long-awaited green light will come after many debates, studies and investigations, and after having been declared by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) a safe food product, “as safe as food from conventional Atlantic salmon” (on 20 September 2010), and with no significant impact to the environment (on 4 May 2012). The last FDA report on environmental safety of the AquAdvantage salmon, prepared more than seven months ago, was eventually made public last week (on 21 December 2012), after an article published in Slate.com suggested political interference of the AquAdvantage’s FDA approval process . Subsequently, several newspapers reported on this FDA’s new report (e.g., Los Angeles Times, Washington Post, The Independent) which appears to be, probably, one of the last steps (still pending the mandatory 60 day period for public comments) before the eventual approval for commercialization of this transgenic fish, after being passed the FDA’s Food Safety and Environmental Safety assessments. If this finally becomes a reality, the AquAdvantage salmon would be the first genetically-modified animal authorised as food for human consumption. These are not only good news for the producing company itself but for the Animal Biotechnology field as a whole.
The AquAdvantage salmon, is a genetically-modified Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) [termed transgenic line EO-1alpha] carrying an “all-fish” transgene (opAFP-GHc2) which contains the coding sequence of the growth hormone gene from the Pacific Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) under the control of 5’ UTR, promoter and 3’ UTR sequences of the type III anti-freeze protein OP5a gene from the ocean pout (Macrozoarces americanus). The transgenic EO-1alpha line grows considerably more rapidly than non-transgenic Atlantic salmon. This genetic modification provides AquAdvantage salmon with the potential to reach market size (4-6 kg) in about half the time required by conventional Atlantic salmon (3 years) cultured commercially in sea cages. This genetically-modified salmon has been described and characterized in several scientific publications (e.g., Du et al. 1992; Yaskowiak et al. 2006; Hobbs and Fletcher 2008; Levesque et al. 2008).
As described in the FDA’s last report, the AquAdvantage salmon would be produced as triploid (and therefore sterile), all-female (and therefore monosex) populations with eyed-eggs as the product for commercial sale and distribution. These eggs would be generated in the AquaBounty Technologies facility on Prince Edward Island (Canada) and thereafter shipped to a grow-out land-based facility in Panama, where they would be reared to market size and harvested for processing (e.g., preparation of fish fillets, steaks, etc.) prior to retail sale in the US. AquAdvantage salmon would not be produced or grown in the US, or in net pens or cages, and no live fish would be imported for processing.

To date, only one single product originated in transgenic animals (ATryn) has been approved by the FDA (in February 2009). ATryn is a recombinant human antithrombin produced by GTC Biotherapeutics in the milk of transgenic goats, indicated for the prevention of peri-operative and peri-partum thromboembolic events in hereditary antithrombin deficient patients. The use of ATryn had been first approved by the EMEA (European Medicines Agency) in July 2006 under exceptional circumstances for the prophylaxis of venous thromboembolism in surgery of patients with congenital antithrombin deficiency. In Europe, a second product produced in transgenic animals (Ruconest) has been already authorised by the EMEA (in October 2010). Ruconest is a recombinant form of human C1 esterase inhibitor, produced by Pharming Group N.V. in the milk of transgenic rabbits and indicated for the treatment of patients with hereditary angioedema caused by mutations in the gene encoding the C1 esterase inhibitor.

Transgenic Animals meeting in Nantes, France, 7 June 2013

Wednesday, December 19th, 2012
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Transgenic Animals meeting in Nantes, France, 7 June 2013

Transgenic Animals meeting in Nantes, France, 7 June 2013

The International Society for Transgenic Technologies (ISTT) is happy to announce the co-sponsorship of the Transgenic Animals meeting that will be held in Nantes (France), on 7th June 2013, on “Technical advances in the generation of transgenic animals and in their applications“. This 1-day event will be the 2013 edition of a transgenic animal meeting that has been held, regularly, every two years, and to which the ISTT has already sponsored the two previous editions, held in 2009 and 2011. This 2013 edition is organized by ISTT Members Ignacio Anegon and Séverine Ménoret, with the help of additional members of the Organizing Committee: Séverine Rémy, Laurent Tesson, Claire Usal, Laure-Héléne Ouisse and Reynald Thynard. The following institutions are organizing and supporting this meeting: Transgenic rats common facility of SFR François Bonamy, Biogenouest and IBiSA. The scientific program of Nantes-2013 includes the following speakers:

  • Bruce Whitelaw (The Roslin Institute and University of Edinburgh, UK), ISTT member
  • Ralf Kühn (Institute for Developmental Genetics, Helmholtz Center Munich, Munich, Germany)
  • Manfred Gossen (Berlin-Brandenburg Center for Regenerative Therapies-Charite, Berlin, Germany)
  • Yann Herault (Institut Clinique de la Souris and IGBMC, Illkirch/Strasbourg, France), ISTT member
  • Alexandre Simon (Inserm Transfert, Paris, France)
  • Belén Pintado (Centro Nacional de Biotecnologia, CSIC, Madrid, Spain), ISTT member
  • Jean-Stephan Joly (INRA U1126, Gif-Sur-Yvette, France)
  • Krzysztof Jagla (UMR CNRS 6293, Clermont-Ferrand, France)
  • Emmanuelle Charpentier (Department “Regulation in Infection Biology”,Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Germany)
  • Xiaoxia Cui (Sigma, St. Louis, USA), ISTT member
  • Carine Giovannangeli (INSERM U 565-CNRS UMR 7196-TALGENE, Paris, France)
  • Ignacio Anegon (INSERM UMR 1064-ITUN, Nantes, France)
ISTT members are entitled to a reduced-fee registration. Registration deadline: 25 May 2013.

Updated program for the TT2013 meeting and hands-on workshop in Guangzhou

Tuesday, November 13th, 2012
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Updated program for the TT2013 meeting and hands-on workshop in Guangzhou (China)

Updated program for the TT2013 meeting and hands-on workshop in Guangzhou (China)

At the International Society for Transgenic Technologies (ISTT), we are pleased to release the most updated scientific, technical and social program for the TT2013 meeting and the associated hands-on workshop that will be held in Guangzhou (China), starting on February 25, 2013. The TT2013 meeting, organized by Ming Zhao and his colleagues of the Southern Medical University in Guangzhou, will begin on Sunday, February 24, with an optional pre-meeting dinner and cruise upon Pearl river, the already classical get-together style of kicking off the last TT meetings, where all participants are kindly invited to participate in order to gather, meet old friends and colleagues and get to know new ones, putting “names to faces” in our field.

The scientific part of the meeting will be held at the Baiyun International Convention Center, in Guangzhou, starting early on Monday, February 25, and will progress until Wednesday, February 27, in the afternoon. We have 33 scientific talks from invited guest speakers, with a wide range of topics in animal transgenesis, including those lectures corresponding to the 9th ISTT Prize (Allan Bradley, Hinxton, UK) and 2nd ISTT Young Investigator Award (Toru Takeo, Kumamoto, Japan), generously sponsored by genOway and inGenious Targeting Laboratory, respectively. We have also selected four short oral presentations among the many submitted abstracts sent to the TT2013 meeting. All accepted abstracts will be published in Transgenic Research (Springer), the scientific journal to which the ISTT is proud to be associated with.

Following the TT2013 meeting, and starting on Thursday, February 28, a 3-day hands-on workshop on basic microinjection and useful techniques in animal transgenesis will take place in Guangzhou, at the Sun Yat-sen University. The TT2013 workshop, limited to 30 participants, is organized by Wenhao Xu (University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA), Ming Zhao (Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China), Jing An (Cancer Institute, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China) and Liangping Li (Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China), who hosts the workshop in his institution.

We greatly thank the support from all the many companies and institutions that decided to sponsor the TT2013 meeting and the workshop.

Registration for the TT2013 meeting at reduced fees is still possible until November 30, 2012. Thereafter, standard registration will begin, until January 31, 2012. If you plan to attend the TT2013 meeting we kindly advise you to register as soon as possible, in order to benefit from cheaper registration fees. In addition, there are still a few slots available for the workshop. These will be filled according to first come/first serve scheme.

Looking forward to meeting you all in Guangzhou! Let’s enjoy another great Transgenic Technology meeting together!


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